Digi Know: Printing out responses to Essay/Short Answer Questions in Blackboard Tests

So, you finally took the plunge and used a short answer/essay style question in your Blackboard test and now you are needing to mark it. Problem is 250 students sat that exam and you have 250 different answers that need marking and just like a written exam you want to make notes/comments on the submitted responses. With a paper based exam this is easy – you just write on the exam script. Turnitin has the functionality to add notes/comments directly onto the assignment submission but with computer based exams, there is no functionality to do this at all.

The other issue is that there is no built in print or export function. However by following the instructions below will help in resolving the above. As I’m sure you have already realized if you want to retain these you will need to keep the hard copies

1 In the Module Management Menu on Blackboard, Select Grade Centre and then Tests.

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The Grade Centre will appear.

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2 Identify the test in the “Grade Information Bar” that has the short answer/essay style question

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3 Click the “Click for more options” arrow next to the test name at the top of the score matrix.3a

4 Select the “Grade Questions” option.

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You will see a screen similar to this

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5 Identify under the Question Type column a question that is a short answer or essay style question.

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6 There will be a number two columns to the right. This is the number of attempts for this question. Click on this number. This will show all the answers submitted to this question

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7 Select the right hand mouse button next to a student name. On the resulting menu select “Print”

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8 Follow the on screen guidance for printing
9 You can now make comments and notes accordingly.

 

10 Don’t forget that after each question you can give student feedback. You may wish to summarize your notes/comments and inform your students of how you marked the question

Digi Know – Turnitin Rubric Examples

Example TII RubricFollowing on from Greg’s post about Rubrics in Turnitin, I thought it would be useful to share a teaching resources page from the Turnitin website, which showcases a variety of rubrics. These rubrics can be downloaded, customised and used in your own assessments.

For further advice and guidance, please contact the TEL team via tel@derby.ac.uk or ext 1865

Digi Know You can use Rubrics with Turnitin

What is a Rubric

A rubric is a guide listing specific criteria for grading or scoring academic papers, projects, or tests to ensure uniform marking. Online rubrics are normally set out in a grid showing criteria down the side and attainment level across the top.

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Importing Turnitin Rubrics

Digi you know that Turnitin has prebuilt rubrics that you can down load and either use straightaway with one of your assignment, or use as a starting point when creating your own rubrics.

Download Turnitin rubrics here: http://turnitin.com/en_us/community/teaching-tools/rubrics

You can also download an excel template for creating rubrics off line from the import page.

Once you have imported a rubric you will be able apply it to any of your assignments. You will also be able to duplicate it and edit it to create new rubrics.

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The above picture is the rubric section of a Turnitin assignment.

At the moment the feature to show which rubric is applied to an assignment is broken. If someone else has applied a rubric to a test you won’t be able to see the rubric here, you will just see the “No rubric/form” option. This does not mean that there is no rubric attached to this assignment. You will be able to see the rubric while marking a paper.

Want to know more

If you want to know more about how you use rubrics with either Turnitin assignments or Blackboard assignments please take a look at our help guides http://www.derby.ac.uk/about/learning-enhancement/learning-teaching/technology-media/helpguides/esubmissionturnitin/ or contact the TEL team at TEL@Derby.ac.uk

Digi Know: Engaging students in the classroom

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It can be difficult for students to stay engaged in a lecture especially if it is long or towards the end of the day. One of the easy ways you can break the session is by getting the students to participate using quiz tools. You can pop questions of different types like Multiple Choice, True/False or even Text Response.

Here are some of the tools:

TurningPoint
Students are given the TurningPoint handsets to use for the selection of their answers during the class quiz. Handsets can be borrowed from the library. Book well in advance of your session to ensure they will be available on the day.

Socrative
Students use their own mobile devices to select the answers. The tool can be freely used from the internet. Tutor needs to create an account so that they can create the quiz questions. Socrative can bring competitiveness to the lecture making learning fun for students.

PollEverywhere
Like Socrative, students use their own mobile devices to select their answers and the tutor needs to create an account. PollEverywhere has an additional question type that allows students to click on an area on a given image. The tutor is able to see the different areas students were clicking on.

Also have a look at our Help Guides and the Ideas Factory for other ideas. For help with any of these tools, contact tel@derby.ac.uk. If you are using or have used any other quiz tool you found useful, could you please let us know by commenting on this post.

Digi Know: Changes to the Turnitin App

Turnitin App LogoDigi Know: Changes to the Turnitin App

Turnitin have rebranded their App, it is now called Turnitin Feedback Studio. You will need to make a a few changes to your app, before you can sync it with current assignment submissions in Course Resources.

To do this:

  • On an iPad go to Settings.
  • Then scroll down and choose “Turnitin” (appears on the left at the bottom of the list).
  • Then choose “Service” (on the right).
  • Then tick the “Feedback Studio UK” option.
  • You should now be able to enter the code from Course Resources.

For further advice and guidance please contact the Technology Enhanced Learning team via tel@derby.ac.uk

Using video to replace written reflection

Maria Potempski, Lecturer in Marketing and Public Relations, College of Business, University of Derby.

The Design and creativity for marketers module requires students to work in groups to produce a four page leaflet that targets a consumer group with a message. The leaflet has to take into account the audience, and consider design elements such as typefaces, colour schemes and layout. Students also must produce a reflective piece which justifies and explains their design choices.

Maria decided that the students should create one or more short videos, rather than a written piece, justifying their choices and deconstructing the leaflet to show how it meets the assignment brief. The students were responsible for creating the videos using their own devices, and uploading them into Media Gallery for submission with the leaflet in a Course Resources Assignment activity.

The majority of students used their mobile phones to create their justification videos and were able to upload them straight into Media Gallery and submit in the assignment.

Maria comments “This is the first time I have used Augmented Reality (AR) videos as a vehicle for an assignment. It seemed very appropriate to use this method as it reflects what the marketing sector is currently using to reach many target audiences.

Student feedback about the module confirmed that they found the use of AR exciting and a welcome alternative to a written paper. Making the videos was straightforward and each student simply used their smartphone. Because the students had to verbalise why they had used certain colour psychology, use of typeface and impactful images it added to their understanding of the design process. Academic integrity was also preserved by the use of a ‘Student Agreement’ that recorded reference material and their agreement that each member of the group had contributed equally to the assignment.

Personally I found this an excellent way of assessing as it demonstrated much more understanding than a traditional written paper. It was also helpful to colleagues who moderated the assignment, easy to use, but above adding an extra dimension to the assignment.”

Sharing audio for peer review and submitting for assessment in Course Resources using Media Gallery

Matt Le Mare. Creative Expressive Therapies, College of Health and Social Care

Matt, who ran the Music and Musicianship module in Spring 2016, wanted a way for students to share their formative music assignment with each other within the Course Resources module so they could do peer feedback. He also wanted the students to submit their final assignment, which comprised a piece of music, through Course Resources.

Matt comments that Media Gallery “…works for me as I wanted to electronically move quickly from assessing audio to text and then back again instead of trolling through usb stick, CDs and DVDs, then reading students’ paper submission, then having to give the feedback on paper. It works for the external examiner because she/he can do the same. For students, they can submit electronically, which is what they wanted to do. They can share it if they wish. It was easily set up, just works, and ‘saves’ time!”.

Sharing media within Course Resources

Media Gallery (Kaltura) was the perfect solution for his requirements. First, using the Media Gallery feature, students were able to upload iterations of their music and publish them within the module.

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A view of the Media Gallery containing students’ formative work

Media Gallery also has a comment feature akin to social media, which allows attributed comments to be posted.

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Submitting media for assignments

Mat also wanted students to submit their final piece of music through Course Resources. Previously dealing with media would have required receiving CDs, DVDs or USB flash memory drives with all of the associated management and potential for damage or loss that entails – especially when required by external examiners.

With Media Gallery, students were able to upload their music and submit it directly through Course Resources “Assignment” where it was safely stored and accessible only to the tutors. External moderators are also able to view the work directly through Course Resources, so there is no more worry about sending off media in the post.

media submission music and muscianship

Summary

Media Gallery provided a simple and robust solution for Mat’s needs. It also enhanced the student experience as they were able to share their music and get feedback from each other which is kept only to the group enrolled within the module. This effectively extended the classroom into an asynchronous space offering more opportunity for students and tutors to interact outside of physical contact time.

The submission of media within Course Resources solved the problem of access and security of assessed work. Pieces were available immediately within Course Resources to tutors and moderators, and management of physical submissions was eliminated.

Recording trainee teachers’ discussions using Panopto’s student Dropbox with group view

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Dr Bill Esmond. Senior Lecturer in Initial Teacher Education: Post 14. College of Education, University of Derby.

Bill’s cohort of trainee FE teachers were considering the current curriculum and the gaps which exist in the teaching of the subject. They had an introductory seminar to consider the issues and then, in small groups, were required to create a video of their discussion which was recorded into a panopto Dropbox. A Dropbox is a special folder that allows students to record presentations to using the Panopto recorder. It can be set to be private so that only the tutor and student can see their recording, or group view, so that everyone in the cohort can view them all. In this case Bill chose group view so that the students could see each others’ work.

A training session for the students went through the basics of Panopto recording, and solved technical problems with installation on students’ computers. For many, this was a new experience, and as Bill says:

“This was clearly a challenging experience for everyone concerned: even trainee teachers are nervous about recording their ideas on shared video, no matter what they might do on [Facebook]. And, yes, there were technical issues: I think most of the Apple people struggled to upload, some sound quality didn’t come out well… and the quality of the medium wasn’t as good as the media teachers would like!”.

However, despite these teething troubles, the result was generally positive.

“But the point of the exercise was really less about the product (the video-clip) than about the process of getting them to discuss ideas in sufficient depth that they felt able to make a video about it. I couldn’t count the number who said to me afterwards how useful they had found the activity because it had made them think about and discuss the issues in far greater depth than they would have done for an open-ended task (and, I suspect, a poster or [Powerpoint]).

So, I think this technology has some potential as a tool for interactive, relatively autonomous learning just as much as it has for the one-way transmission of lectures.”

In summary, although Panopto’s main feature is recording traditional lectures, it contains an option which has the potential to engage students with material in a different way. Analytics of the students’ recordings shows that many of the presentations had at least five unique viewers which means that peers were attending to each other’s’ work.

Using videos in forums for an online course’s student formative assessment

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Yasu Kotera (left), Wendy David. UDOL Online Counselling. University of Derby Online (UDOL).

Students from around the world were studying on the University of Derby Online course in Counselling Skills. Part of the assessment involves students recording their counselling sessions for tutors to view and feedback on. Course Resources is limited in the way it handles large files, especially videos, so Yasu and Wendy were pleased to use Media Gallery (Kaltura) as a way of sharing video. In this case, students recorded a short video, usually on their phone, and shared it by embedding it into a forum. This allowed tutors and peers to comment on the video.

Capture

In this screenshot, the uploaded video is displayed over the forum which contains a dialogue between the student and tutor.

Yasu comments “I manage the counselling programmes at the University of Derby Online Learning. Our programmes include video assessments, where students record their counselling sessions and the tutors and peers make comments on them. We used to mail those DVDs to evaluate their counselling skills, but as the programme expanded, it just became unfeasible. Then we started to use a file transfer system, but it still took a lot of time to up / download the videos. We had been trying to find a scalable and secure way to conduct the video assessments, and heard about Media Gallery. Media Gallery enables students upload their video easily in a secure way, and the tutors and peers can see and make comments to improve their counselling skills. This is really crucial in the counselling studies online. We are planning to use Media Gallery more in our programmes

2016 e-Assessment Question Conference

TEL represented the University at the recent e-Assessment Question conference in London in March.

The theme of this years conference was ‘The Future: e-Assessment opportunities and barriers, risks and rewards’.

The presentation that most stuck out for me was that of Tim Burnett from BTL Learning and Assessment. He asked “What’s the future for written exams?”.

The context behind this being that education is changing and technology is being used more and more in the classroom by learners and teachers. Although technology is unlocking further potential in learning, it is struggling to do the same for assessment. If learning and assessment fail to develop together, we have to start asking the following questions: ·

  • Is it fair to ask all students to write in assessments? ·
  • Are we at risk of assessment being left behind with the growth of educational technology? ·
  • Is there becoming a social divide in assessment technology use? ·
  • Are we at risk of invalidating assessment?

In the session we looked for evidence to support change, listening to representatives from different aspects of the education sector and reviewing the options for change and the challenges that come with them. Delegates from all sectors contributed with their viewpoint as assessment specialists, but also as parents and lifelong learners.

Another interesting session was that of Jeremy Carter of Cirrus Assessment about educational technology systems (edtech) or using standalone solutions and the role of the assessment tools within them. There were some interesting discussion points that were raised including

  • Are we providing the best experience for students
  • Should we be in house or utilize 3rd party services in order to meet our objectives.
  • Where does e-assessment fit within the learning and teaching

Although aimed at the level 1 -3 qualification ( Apprentice/NVQ) Ecom Scotland demonstrated a electronic version of an marking matrix that has replaced paper. Unlike previous methods this system can work with multiple devices and also offline. (Useful as many locations where apprentices where working do not have internet access or somewhere for laptops. )

There was also a couple of interesting presentations on how organisations have used e-assessment including how the British Council have overcome the issues of localisation in places like India where being chased by a rhino is as likely as powercuts.