Digi Know: Engaging students in the classroom

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It can be difficult for students to stay engaged in a lecture especially if it is long or towards the end of the day. One of the easy ways you can break the session is by getting the students to participate using quiz tools. You can pop questions of different types like Multiple Choice, True/False or even Text Response.

Here are some of the tools:

TurningPoint
Students are given the TurningPoint handsets to use for the selection of their answers during the class quiz. Handsets can be borrowed from the library. Book well in advance of your session to ensure they will be available on the day.

Socrative
Students use their own mobile devices to select the answers. The tool can be freely used from the internet. Tutor needs to create an account so that they can create the quiz questions. Socrative can bring competitiveness to the lecture making learning fun for students.

PollEverywhere
Like Socrative, students use their own mobile devices to select their answers and the tutor needs to create an account. PollEverywhere has an additional question type that allows students to click on an area on a given image. The tutor is able to see the different areas students were clicking on.

Also have a look at our Help Guides and the Ideas Factory for other ideas. For help with any of these tools, contact tel@derby.ac.uk. If you are using or have used any other quiz tool you found useful, could you please let us know by commenting on this post.

Appy Monday – Sketches

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What is Sketches? 

Tayasui Sketches is a drawing app which enables you to draw out your notes, doodles and diagrams on your iPad or iPhone and organise these into collections.

What can it do? 

  • Enable you to draw electronic sketches using a variety of different drawing tools and a wide range of colours.
  • Use patterns to fill large areas of the picture.
  • Add text and shapes to add further meaning.
  • Share your drawings via email or social media tools such as Facebook and Flickr.
  • Add photos with your camera as a background to an image.

Download it now

How could it be used for learning, teaching and assessment?

  • To take notes during a lecture or seminar combining text, drawings and diagrams to represent key points.
  • To create visual images which help to break-up heavily text based learning resources or presentations.
  • Challenge students to represent a concept or idea using drawings only and share this in class or on a shared area in Course Resources such as a discussion board.

Short task: 

  • Download the app.
  • Open the app and try drawing the University of Derby logo.
  • Save the picture.
  • Email this to yourself.

Important note

Before using any mobile application or online service please check the terms and conditions to ensure you are aware of the implications of using the service. In particular, look out for items covering data security, ownership of content and public/private sharing options.

Further support

If you would like further support to get an idea of how you could use Sketches within learning and teaching, please contact the Technology Enhanced Learning team on tel@derby.ac.uk or ext 1865.

Appy Monday – Padlet

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What Is Padlet?

Getting your students to engage is a difficult task at the best of times. Whilst there are tools within the VLE to do this such as Forums and Wikis, these tend to take a prescriptive approach and take students down a particular route in participation.

Padlet’s USP is that it is flexible allowing the user to work with what is effectively a metaphoric piece of paper which upon it the user can put whatever they like on it. Videos, Sound files, Photographs, other images, written text or uploaded documents.

It is also collaborative so can be used for group working and sharing for assessment purposes.

Each active Padlet can be embedded into Blackboard and whilst the administration side requires an account, contributing to an active padlet does not.

Download it now..

Padlet is available for the iPhone/iPad and Android. As a web based app it can also run on Windows and Apple Macs.

Because of its multi platform approach, it means that contributions can be made from anywhere with a internet connection allowing instantaneous contributions or postings rather than later when the context may have been lost.

How could it be used for Learning Teaching and Assessment?

Because of its flexibility in terms of its empty piece of paper analogy it can be used for but not limited to.

  • Blogs
  • Collages
  • Collaborative note-taking
  • CVs/Resumes
  • Digital bulletin boards
  • Fashion design
  • Inspiration boards
  • Music playlists
  • Noticeboards
  • Photo albums
  • Portfolios
  • Professional development
  • Q+A
  • Solo or group presentations
  • Timelines
  • To-Do lists
  • Video playlists

Short Task

Install the app onto your device and then create a Padlet adding images, pdf’s, text and so on. Exit the application and then return to it and add some more. Log onto Padlet via a PC/Mac and see your work.

Important Note

Before using any mobile application or online service please check the terms and conditions to ensure you are aware of the implications of using the service. In particular, look out for items covering data security, ownership of content and public/private sharing options.

Further Support

If you would like further support to get an idea of how you could use Padlet within learning and teaching, please contact the Technology Enhanced Learning team on tel@derby.ac.uk or ext 1865.

Useful Resources

 

Recording trainee teachers’ discussions using Panopto’s student Dropbox with group view

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Dr Bill Esmond. Senior Lecturer in Initial Teacher Education: Post 14. College of Education, University of Derby.

Bill’s cohort of trainee FE teachers were considering the current curriculum and the gaps which exist in the teaching of the subject. They had an introductory seminar to consider the issues and then, in small groups, were required to create a video of their discussion which was recorded into a panopto Dropbox. A Dropbox is a special folder that allows students to record presentations to using the Panopto recorder. It can be set to be private so that only the tutor and student can see their recording, or group view, so that everyone in the cohort can view them all. In this case Bill chose group view so that the students could see each others’ work.

A training session for the students went through the basics of Panopto recording, and solved technical problems with installation on students’ computers. For many, this was a new experience, and as Bill says:

“This was clearly a challenging experience for everyone concerned: even trainee teachers are nervous about recording their ideas on shared video, no matter what they might do on [Facebook]. And, yes, there were technical issues: I think most of the Apple people struggled to upload, some sound quality didn’t come out well… and the quality of the medium wasn’t as good as the media teachers would like!”.

However, despite these teething troubles, the result was generally positive.

“But the point of the exercise was really less about the product (the video-clip) than about the process of getting them to discuss ideas in sufficient depth that they felt able to make a video about it. I couldn’t count the number who said to me afterwards how useful they had found the activity because it had made them think about and discuss the issues in far greater depth than they would have done for an open-ended task (and, I suspect, a poster or [Powerpoint]).

So, I think this technology has some potential as a tool for interactive, relatively autonomous learning just as much as it has for the one-way transmission of lectures.”

In summary, although Panopto’s main feature is recording traditional lectures, it contains an option which has the potential to engage students with material in a different way. Analytics of the students’ recordings shows that many of the presentations had at least five unique viewers which means that peers were attending to each other’s’ work.

Using videos in forums for an online course’s student formative assessment

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Yasu Kotera (left), Wendy David. UDOL Online Counselling. University of Derby Online (UDOL).

Students from around the world were studying on the University of Derby Online course in Counselling Skills. Part of the assessment involves students recording their counselling sessions for tutors to view and feedback on. Course Resources is limited in the way it handles large files, especially videos, so Yasu and Wendy were pleased to use Media Gallery (Kaltura) as a way of sharing video. In this case, students recorded a short video, usually on their phone, and shared it by embedding it into a forum. This allowed tutors and peers to comment on the video.

Capture

In this screenshot, the uploaded video is displayed over the forum which contains a dialogue between the student and tutor.

Yasu comments “I manage the counselling programmes at the University of Derby Online Learning. Our programmes include video assessments, where students record their counselling sessions and the tutors and peers make comments on them. We used to mail those DVDs to evaluate their counselling skills, but as the programme expanded, it just became unfeasible. Then we started to use a file transfer system, but it still took a lot of time to up / download the videos. We had been trying to find a scalable and secure way to conduct the video assessments, and heard about Media Gallery. Media Gallery enables students upload their video easily in a secure way, and the tutors and peers can see and make comments to improve their counselling skills. This is really crucial in the counselling studies online. We are planning to use Media Gallery more in our programmes

Appy Monday – iMovie on an IPad/IPhone

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What is iMovie?

Video is now used more in everyday life than it has ever been, due to the introduction of smartphones and tablets with videoing capability.  So it’s useful to have an editing App which is simple to use, but also has a lot of the professional aspects you get with industry standard software like Adobe Premiere Pro.

iMovie is an editing app for Apple devices (often available for free if you own a recent iPad or iPhone) which just costs a few pounds to download from the AppStore. It’s worth having!

As a video editing tool, iMovie is easy to use – you don’t need years of practice or a degree in Media production, just the ability to move things around using one finger!

What can I do?

  •   Edit footage straight from your iPad/ iPhone.
  •   Film straight into iMovie from your device’s camera
  •   Add audio and imagery to your video
  •   Record audio in iMovie to add to your video
  •   Add titles/text to your videos
  •   Share it to your own YouTube/Facebook channels

Available Platform

iMovie is available on Apple devices only, and can be downloaded from iTunes

How could it be used for learning, teaching and assessment?

  •   To create quick and simple instructional videos
  •   Student-created video assessment
  •   Video feedback to students
  •   Virtual field trips (film and edit while on location)
  •   Filming and editing on the go
  •   It enables quick and easy upload for students to access.

Short Task

Film something with you iPad/iPhone, bring it into iMovie and start looking at how you can cut, trim and move the footage around and how you can access video from your device to use in your video.

Important Note

Before using any mobile application or online service please check the terms and conditions to ensure you are aware of the implications of using the service. In particular, look out for items covering data security, ownership of content and public/private sharing options.

Further Support

 

If you would like further support to get an idea of how you could use iMovie within learning and teaching, please contact the Technology Enhanced Learning team on tel@derby.ac.uk or ext 1865.

Appy Monday – IF (IFTTT)

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What is it?

If (Ifttt) stands for If This Then That and enables you to create simple connections between different online services which can help you to automate some everyday tasks. For instance a simple ‘recipe’ could be that whenever you publish a blog post Ifttt automatically sends a Tweet telling others about this on your Twitter feed. There are many different combinations of actions you can make, it all depends upon which services you use and the actions you would want to automate.

 

What can it do?

It would be difficult to list everything this app can do but as described above it can automate some every day tasks to help you to manage and share your online resources more effectively. It links to over 200 different online services and provides thousands of different combinations of actions. So for instance not only can you link your blog to automatically tweet when a new post is published, you can also set out how you want the tweet to look and include specific hashtags.

Download it now… 

How could it be used for learning, teaching and assessment?

There are many possibilities about how this tool could be used for learning, teaching and assessment but here are just a few ideas:

  • Automatically post a tweet when a new blog post is published.
  • Receive an email when a new story appears on a popular news website.
  • Enable the tweets you like to be sent to your note taking app (e.g. Evernote or OneNote).
  • Send Tweets using a specific hashtag sent to a story on your Storify.
  • Create a Trello card for each of the meetings you have in your Office365 calendar.

Short task:

This task requires you to already have an account on Twitter:

  • Download the IF mobile app
  • Create an account and sign in
  • Browse the recipes to get an idea of what might be possible searching for the online services you use (e.g. Twitter).
  • Think of a hashtag which you use regularly.
  • Set up a recipe which builds a Twitter list of users who have used a particular hashtag in their tweets.
  • Save the recipe and make sure it is turned on.
  • Get others to start using this hashtag in their tweets.
  • Watch your Twitter list grow.

Important note:

Before using any mobile application or online service please check the terms and conditions to ensure you are aware of the implications of using the service. In particular, look out for items covering data security, ownership of content and public/private sharing options.

Useful resources:

Appy Monday – Feedly

Banner showing Digital Derby and Appy Monday: Exploring mobile apps for learning and teachingWhat is it?

Feedly is a tool which collects together new information posted on websites, blogs and YouTube channels. Once new information is posted to one of these sites then it will appear in your feed. It could be considered a similar tool to an RSS aggregator.

The New Feedly Mobile from Feedly on Vimeo.

What can it do?

Feedly can collect and present information in a clean, minimalist format, where you can organise this content into collections, identify articles for you to read later and share what you have discovered with social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest. Please note you can only share collections if you upgrade to a pro account, although you can share individual articles.

Download it now…

From the Apple store

From Google Play

How could it be used for learning, teaching and assessment?

  • Encourage students to set up their own collection of useful websites, blogs and other web-based sources of information.
  • Students can then view and read this information via the mobile app wherever they are.
  • Share relevant articles on social media channels for the course like a Twitter feed and encourage students to do the same using a shared hashtag.
  • Collect articles together in a note taking tool like Evernote or OneNote for you to read and add to later.

Short task:

  • Download the Feedly app
  • Login or create a Feedly account
  • Add content from a website by copying and pasting in a website address e.g. www.bbc.co.uk/news
  • Read a relevant article on the website and then share this via email or on Twitter.
  • Take a look at the app later in the day to see what new articles have appeared.

Important note

Before using any mobile application or online service please check the terms and conditions to ensure you are aware of the implications of using the service. In particular, look out for items covering data security, ownership of content and public/private sharing options.

Further support

If you would like further support to get an idea of how you could use Feedly within learning and teaching, please contact the Technology Enhanced Learning team on tel@derby.ac.uk or ext 1865.

TEL me more about…….Periscope

At the TEL me more event in March we were fortunate to see Louise Hart talk about periscope and how she has been using it when teaching her ESOL students. Periscope is a live video streaming app which is available for iOS and Android which although similar to services like Blackboard Collaborate requires less setting up with the user being able to be up and running in a matter of seconds. Whilst Periscope is not designed to replace any lecture capture of existing video conferencing tools it could compliment them being able to allow video conferencing where there is no suitable technology for the existing technology.

As with Twitter you have followers (for example, your students) who when you start broadcasting (or scoping to quote the terminology) will receive notification that you have started your broadcast or users can integrate the system looking for live broadcasts. You can however lock down your scoping to just your followers or just a chosen few users.
Although not a two way communication tool like Blackboard Collaborate or GoToMeeting, viewers can send messages and can send “hearts” as a form of appreciation.
Whilst scopes will be deleted 24 hours after first broadcast by default they can be saved for later use.

How to use Periscope

  • Virtual Campus tours
  • Live practicals or demonstrations in the classroom, lab or workshop
  • Icebreaker activities where small groups of students interview each other, and share in the class

Other resources

Periscope vs. Facebook Live: Is the battle over live streaming heating up?

GoPro goes live with Periscope

12 Ways to Use Periscope to Build Your Personal Brand!

Digi Know: Mobile apps to support study skills

mobile learningThis blog post provides information about a series of mobile apps which you may find useful for notetaking, mindmapping, task management and organisation. Unless otherwise stated you should be able to get these apps on both Apple and Android devices. Just search for them in either the iTunes App store or on Google Play. These apps are all free but there may be in app purchases in order to access additional features.

Please ensure you read the terms and conditions for using the mobile app to understand the apps commitment to intellectual property rights, data protection and information security.

Notetaking

Evernote

  • Take electronic notes combining text, images and audio.
  • Organise these into notebooks.
  • Automatically sync them across your different devices. This means you can start taking notes using your tablet and then finish these on your computer.
  • Share your notebooks with other people.
  • Create task lists to keep you organised.

Microsoft OneNote

  • Create digital notebooks which you can then access online either via an App on your mobile device or via an internet browser.
  • The University provides this to students as part of Office365.
  • Create notebooks to collect thoughts and ideas, to-do lists, capture images of documents, whiteboards, or take clips from websites.
  • Organise these within notebooks.

Google Docs (Used with Google Drive)

  • Online word processing tool which is similar to Microsoft Word but the documents are stored and accessed online.
  • Mobile app allows you to access and edit these documents online or offline and then syncs these once you are connected again.
  • Add and format text, images and drawings.
  • Use the Voice typing feature where you can speak into a microphone and have your words typed automatically.
  • Work is automatically saved for you and you can use the revision history to look at old versions of the document.
  • Share and collaborate on documents together at the same time.

Audioboom

  • Record up to 10 minutes of audio from your mobile device.
  • Upload an unlimited amount of clips to your profile and organise these into a set of playlists.
  • Share your clips with others via Twitter and Facebook.
  • Follow and comment on other people’s clips stored on Audioboom.
  • Audio files are publically available as there are no options for individual users to have a private channel.

Cogi

  • Capture short sections of audio using a simple record button.
  • Highlight particular parts of the recording when you think ‘this is important I must make a note of this’.
  • In case you missed the first part of the idea, it will go back 15 seconds within the recording to capture what you might have missed.
  • Add important notes, photographs and visual information such as whiteboards/presentation slides within the recording.
  • Focus on what is being said instead of having to take notes.

Sketches (Apple only)

  • Draw out your notes, doodles and diagrams on your iPad or iPhone and organise these into collections.
  • Draw your sketches using a variety of different drawing tools and a wide range of colours.
  • Use patterns to fill large areas of the picture, add text and shapes to add further meaning.
  • Share your drawings via email or social media tools such as Facebook and Flickr.

Mindmapping

Mindjet Maps

  • Create simple and complex mindmaps on your tablet.
  • Send the mindmap to yourself as a PDF file.
  • Use colours to distinguish between different ideas within the mindmap.
  • Add images/photos to the mindmap to make it more visual.
  • Add links to webpages and other online resources.

Task management and organisation

Wunderlist

  • Create a series of to-do lists to help organise your learning tasks.
  • Receive reminders for tasks that need to be completed soon.
  • Share your lists with others and use the comments feature to communicate about shared tasks.
  • Access these lists across your different devices (e.g. on smartphone, tablet and computer).
  • Print your to do lists.

Trello

  • Create boards and cards to help organise your projects.
  • Share project board with other people or use this for group work.
  • Add checklists, labels and due dates to cards to keep track of tasks.
  • Receive notifications detailing any changes to the board or cards you are added to (this can be emailed to you).
  • Add resources to cards such as links to documents, websites and presentation slides
  • Use this to help plan assignments or manage research tasks.