Digi Know – Module Evaluation Surveys now accessible from Course Resources

With the EvaSys evaluation system successfully talking to Blackboard, students can now access module evaluation links to online surveys via Course Resources. Any available surveys will be displayed in the section called My Surveys which can be seen when they log into Course Resources.

If there are no surveys or once they have taken surveys, a message will be displayed advising that there are no surveys as shown below.

Once the students complete the surveys, their responses are registered into the EvaSys evaluation system ready for reporting.

Digi Know: Printing out responses to Essay/Short Answer Questions in Blackboard Tests

So, you finally took the plunge and used a short answer/essay style question in your Blackboard test and now you are needing to mark it. Problem is 250 students sat that exam and you have 250 different answers that need marking and just like a written exam you want to make notes/comments on the submitted responses. With a paper based exam this is easy – you just write on the exam script. Turnitin has the functionality to add notes/comments directly onto the assignment submission but with computer based exams, there is no functionality to do this at all.

The other issue is that there is no built in print or export function. However by following the instructions below will help in resolving the above. As I’m sure you have already realized if you want to retain these you will need to keep the hard copies

1 In the Module Management Menu on Blackboard, Select Grade Centre and then Tests.

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The Grade Centre will appear.

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2 Identify the test in the “Grade Information Bar” that has the short answer/essay style question

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3 Click the “Click for more options” arrow next to the test name at the top of the score matrix.3a

4 Select the “Grade Questions” option.

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You will see a screen similar to this

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5 Identify under the Question Type column a question that is a short answer or essay style question.

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6 There will be a number two columns to the right. This is the number of attempts for this question. Click on this number. This will show all the answers submitted to this question

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7 Select the right hand mouse button next to a student name. On the resulting menu select “Print”

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8 Follow the on screen guidance for printing
9 You can now make comments and notes accordingly.

 

10 Don’t forget that after each question you can give student feedback. You may wish to summarize your notes/comments and inform your students of how you marked the question

Digi Know – Turnitin Rubric Examples

Example TII RubricFollowing on from Greg’s post about Rubrics in Turnitin, I thought it would be useful to share a teaching resources page from the Turnitin website, which showcases a variety of rubrics. These rubrics can be downloaded, customised and used in your own assessments.

For further advice and guidance, please contact the TEL team via tel@derby.ac.uk or ext 1865

Digi Know: You can see what student’s see

A tip that a few people have found useful recently is using Edit Mode in Course Resources to check what students can see in modules. This has come in handy when academics have been told by students they can’t see some content.

Simply by turning Edit Mode off, you’ll be able to have a student eye view of a module area. Here’s the difference it makes to the module menu:

Edit Button in Course Resources

Digi Know: Provisional Grades & Feedback tool

Course Resources now has the Provisional Tools and Feedback tool enabled. Please see the video below for a brief overview. The tool currently exists in the module navigation, but is hidden until enabled by a tutor.

capturehttp://www.kaltura.com/tiny/nwu3o

For more information and guidance, please view our help guides or contact the tel@derby.ac.uk

Digi know: Organising content with folders in Course Resources (Blackboard)

Image from: Quinn Dombrowski shared under CC BY-SA 2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/quinnanya/

Image from: Quinn Dombrowski
shared under CC BY-SA 2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/quinnanya/

All content in Blackboard can be organised through folders, just like on your computer.

Folders can be used to organise content by week or topic – depending on how you want to present your course and what types of material you are making available to support the students.

Once the folder has been created, you have a new Content Area to begin adding all your normal resources, links and assignments.

Organise by topic

If you have a variety of content for a specific topic area; such as PowerPoint slides, lecture recordings (Panopto), screencasts, extra reading, web links (this list could go on for a while), you could break your course down into those individual topic areas and make all these topic-related resources available under that one folder. This means that when a student is looking to revise a specific area, they know they can find all the support material in once place.

Organise by week

You might decide that organising weekly would make more sense to your teaching structure, this might be because you have weekly tasks or tests. If organising this way, it’s worth adding descriptions to your folders reminding students what was covered under each week.

Creating folders

Creating folders is easy, full instructions for adding content (including folders) can be found on the Blackboard help pages.

Limiting availability

Once folders have been created, you can limit availability based on time (i.e. create now, make available to students later), or on membership (i.e. make available to a specific users or groups). More information on limiting availability using adaptive release is available on the Blackboard help pages

 

Using video to replace written reflection

Maria Potempski, Lecturer in Marketing and Public Relations, College of Business, University of Derby.

The Design and creativity for marketers module requires students to work in groups to produce a four page leaflet that targets a consumer group with a message. The leaflet has to take into account the audience, and consider design elements such as typefaces, colour schemes and layout. Students also must produce a reflective piece which justifies and explains their design choices.

Maria decided that the students should create one or more short videos, rather than a written piece, justifying their choices and deconstructing the leaflet to show how it meets the assignment brief. The students were responsible for creating the videos using their own devices, and uploading them into Media Gallery for submission with the leaflet in a Course Resources Assignment activity.

The majority of students used their mobile phones to create their justification videos and were able to upload them straight into Media Gallery and submit in the assignment.

Maria comments “This is the first time I have used Augmented Reality (AR) videos as a vehicle for an assignment. It seemed very appropriate to use this method as it reflects what the marketing sector is currently using to reach many target audiences.

Student feedback about the module confirmed that they found the use of AR exciting and a welcome alternative to a written paper. Making the videos was straightforward and each student simply used their smartphone. Because the students had to verbalise why they had used certain colour psychology, use of typeface and impactful images it added to their understanding of the design process. Academic integrity was also preserved by the use of a ‘Student Agreement’ that recorded reference material and their agreement that each member of the group had contributed equally to the assignment.

Personally I found this an excellent way of assessing as it demonstrated much more understanding than a traditional written paper. It was also helpful to colleagues who moderated the assignment, easy to use, but above adding an extra dimension to the assignment.”

Sharing audio for peer review and submitting for assessment in Course Resources using Media Gallery

Matt Le Mare. Creative Expressive Therapies, College of Health and Social Care

Matt, who ran the Music and Musicianship module in Spring 2016, wanted a way for students to share their formative music assignment with each other within the Course Resources module so they could do peer feedback. He also wanted the students to submit their final assignment, which comprised a piece of music, through Course Resources.

Matt comments that Media Gallery “…works for me as I wanted to electronically move quickly from assessing audio to text and then back again instead of trolling through usb stick, CDs and DVDs, then reading students’ paper submission, then having to give the feedback on paper. It works for the external examiner because she/he can do the same. For students, they can submit electronically, which is what they wanted to do. They can share it if they wish. It was easily set up, just works, and ‘saves’ time!”.

Sharing media within Course Resources

Media Gallery (Kaltura) was the perfect solution for his requirements. First, using the Media Gallery feature, students were able to upload iterations of their music and publish them within the module.

media gallery music and musician ship

A view of the Media Gallery containing students’ formative work

Media Gallery also has a comment feature akin to social media, which allows attributed comments to be posted.

media gallery comment

Submitting media for assignments

Mat also wanted students to submit their final piece of music through Course Resources. Previously dealing with media would have required receiving CDs, DVDs or USB flash memory drives with all of the associated management and potential for damage or loss that entails – especially when required by external examiners.

With Media Gallery, students were able to upload their music and submit it directly through Course Resources “Assignment” where it was safely stored and accessible only to the tutors. External moderators are also able to view the work directly through Course Resources, so there is no more worry about sending off media in the post.

media submission music and muscianship

Summary

Media Gallery provided a simple and robust solution for Mat’s needs. It also enhanced the student experience as they were able to share their music and get feedback from each other which is kept only to the group enrolled within the module. This effectively extended the classroom into an asynchronous space offering more opportunity for students and tutors to interact outside of physical contact time.

The submission of media within Course Resources solved the problem of access and security of assessed work. Pieces were available immediately within Course Resources to tutors and moderators, and management of physical submissions was eliminated.

Digi Know: Structuring your content using Blackboard Learning Elements

Blackboard Learning Elements provide a neat way of presenting content in Course Resources in a way that is easy for students to navigate. Content items are presented as pages such that students can go directly to a particular page they want and they can also use the arrows to move from one page to the next. Sequential viewing can be enforced if necessary from the options e.g. if students have to complete a particular activity before they move on to the next resource.

Learning Elements
Fig 1. 2 Learning Elements

LE TOC
Fig 2. Table of Contents of the Learning Element with page 1 displayed showing an Item

LE img
Fig 3. Page 4 of the Learning Element showing an Image

Creating Learning Elements can easily be done in Course Resources (Blackboard) via Build Content and selecting Learning Element.

Creating-LE
Fig 4. How to create a Learning Element in Course Resources (Blackboard)

Once the Learning Element has been created, click on it and add the different learning resources directly into it, e.g. items, files, images, videos, etc.

Recording trainee teachers’ discussions using Panopto’s student Dropbox with group view

Bill-Esmond-U-150x200

Dr Bill Esmond. Senior Lecturer in Initial Teacher Education: Post 14. College of Education, University of Derby.

Bill’s cohort of trainee FE teachers were considering the current curriculum and the gaps which exist in the teaching of the subject. They had an introductory seminar to consider the issues and then, in small groups, were required to create a video of their discussion which was recorded into a panopto Dropbox. A Dropbox is a special folder that allows students to record presentations to using the Panopto recorder. It can be set to be private so that only the tutor and student can see their recording, or group view, so that everyone in the cohort can view them all. In this case Bill chose group view so that the students could see each others’ work.

A training session for the students went through the basics of Panopto recording, and solved technical problems with installation on students’ computers. For many, this was a new experience, and as Bill says:

“This was clearly a challenging experience for everyone concerned: even trainee teachers are nervous about recording their ideas on shared video, no matter what they might do on [Facebook]. And, yes, there were technical issues: I think most of the Apple people struggled to upload, some sound quality didn’t come out well… and the quality of the medium wasn’t as good as the media teachers would like!”.

However, despite these teething troubles, the result was generally positive.

“But the point of the exercise was really less about the product (the video-clip) than about the process of getting them to discuss ideas in sufficient depth that they felt able to make a video about it. I couldn’t count the number who said to me afterwards how useful they had found the activity because it had made them think about and discuss the issues in far greater depth than they would have done for an open-ended task (and, I suspect, a poster or [Powerpoint]).

So, I think this technology has some potential as a tool for interactive, relatively autonomous learning just as much as it has for the one-way transmission of lectures.”

In summary, although Panopto’s main feature is recording traditional lectures, it contains an option which has the potential to engage students with material in a different way. Analytics of the students’ recordings shows that many of the presentations had at least five unique viewers which means that peers were attending to each other’s’ work.