Sharing audio for peer review and submitting for assessment in Course Resources using Media Gallery

Matt Le Mare. Creative Expressive Therapies, College of Health and Social Care

Matt, who ran the Music and Musicianship module in Spring 2016, wanted a way for students to share their formative music assignment with each other within the Course Resources module so they could do peer feedback. He also wanted the students to submit their final assignment, which comprised a piece of music, through Course Resources.

Matt comments that Media Gallery “…works for me as I wanted to electronically move quickly from assessing audio to text and then back again instead of trolling through usb stick, CDs and DVDs, then reading students’ paper submission, then having to give the feedback on paper. It works for the external examiner because she/he can do the same. For students, they can submit electronically, which is what they wanted to do. They can share it if they wish. It was easily set up, just works, and ‘saves’ time!”.

Sharing media within Course Resources

Media Gallery (Kaltura) was the perfect solution for his requirements. First, using the Media Gallery feature, students were able to upload iterations of their music and publish them within the module.

media gallery music and musician ship

A view of the Media Gallery containing students’ formative work

Media Gallery also has a comment feature akin to social media, which allows attributed comments to be posted.

media gallery comment

Submitting media for assignments

Mat also wanted students to submit their final piece of music through Course Resources. Previously dealing with media would have required receiving CDs, DVDs or USB flash memory drives with all of the associated management and potential for damage or loss that entails – especially when required by external examiners.

With Media Gallery, students were able to upload their music and submit it directly through Course Resources “Assignment” where it was safely stored and accessible only to the tutors. External moderators are also able to view the work directly through Course Resources, so there is no more worry about sending off media in the post.

media submission music and muscianship

Summary

Media Gallery provided a simple and robust solution for Mat’s needs. It also enhanced the student experience as they were able to share their music and get feedback from each other which is kept only to the group enrolled within the module. This effectively extended the classroom into an asynchronous space offering more opportunity for students and tutors to interact outside of physical contact time.

The submission of media within Course Resources solved the problem of access and security of assessed work. Pieces were available immediately within Course Resources to tutors and moderators, and management of physical submissions was eliminated.

Recording trainee teachers’ discussions using Panopto’s student Dropbox with group view

Bill-Esmond-U-150x200

Dr Bill Esmond. Senior Lecturer in Initial Teacher Education: Post 14. College of Education, University of Derby.

Bill’s cohort of trainee FE teachers were considering the current curriculum and the gaps which exist in the teaching of the subject. They had an introductory seminar to consider the issues and then, in small groups, were required to create a video of their discussion which was recorded into a panopto Dropbox. A Dropbox is a special folder that allows students to record presentations to using the Panopto recorder. It can be set to be private so that only the tutor and student can see their recording, or group view, so that everyone in the cohort can view them all. In this case Bill chose group view so that the students could see each others’ work.

A training session for the students went through the basics of Panopto recording, and solved technical problems with installation on students’ computers. For many, this was a new experience, and as Bill says:

“This was clearly a challenging experience for everyone concerned: even trainee teachers are nervous about recording their ideas on shared video, no matter what they might do on [Facebook]. And, yes, there were technical issues: I think most of the Apple people struggled to upload, some sound quality didn’t come out well… and the quality of the medium wasn’t as good as the media teachers would like!”.

However, despite these teething troubles, the result was generally positive.

“But the point of the exercise was really less about the product (the video-clip) than about the process of getting them to discuss ideas in sufficient depth that they felt able to make a video about it. I couldn’t count the number who said to me afterwards how useful they had found the activity because it had made them think about and discuss the issues in far greater depth than they would have done for an open-ended task (and, I suspect, a poster or [Powerpoint]).

So, I think this technology has some potential as a tool for interactive, relatively autonomous learning just as much as it has for the one-way transmission of lectures.”

In summary, although Panopto’s main feature is recording traditional lectures, it contains an option which has the potential to engage students with material in a different way. Analytics of the students’ recordings shows that many of the presentations had at least five unique viewers which means that peers were attending to each other’s’ work.

Updating your Course Resources Test

For many people it is time to start updating your tests delivered through Course Resources (Blackboard).  Anyone that requires assistance or guidance should contact Ian Hallsworth (I.Hallsworth@derby.ac.uk) in LSR as soon as possible. However, one of the benefits of delivering tests through Course Resources is that they are very easy to update yourself.  You can do this by following the brief steps outlined below:

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eAssessment Scotland 2011

Statue of penguins in Dundee

On the 25th and 26th of August I attended the eAssessment Scotland conference in Dundee.  A sound-byte repeated several times during the conference was that we should “assess in the same way that students learn”.  This was partly taken to mean the inclusion of social media and electronic devices that the stereo-typical student immerses themselves in.  However there was a more concrete issue raised both by one of the posters (voted best at the conference) and in Donald Clark’s typically boisterous keynote: students (along with everyone else) are used to the benefits of word processors, which allow creating drafts, re-editing, copy and pasting to rearrange the structure etc.  Expecting students to go into an exam, take-up the seldom used pen and paper, and write essays from start to finish in one go, simply won’t get the best out of them.

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CAA 2011

This year’s Computer Aided Assessment (CAA) conference was held on the 5th and 6th of July; and I attended to present a paper on our migration from one computer-based assessment system (TRIADS) to another (Blackboard). In this post I will attempt to summarise the main themes, and highlight interesting developments.

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