Using video to replace written reflection

Maria Potempski, Lecturer in Marketing and Public Relations, College of Business, University of Derby.

The Design and creativity for marketers module requires students to work in groups to produce a four page leaflet that targets a consumer group with a message. The leaflet has to take into account the audience, and consider design elements such as typefaces, colour schemes and layout. Students also must produce a reflective piece which justifies and explains their design choices.

Maria decided that the students should create one or more short videos, rather than a written piece, justifying their choices and deconstructing the leaflet to show how it meets the assignment brief. The students were responsible for creating the videos using their own devices, and uploading them into Media Gallery for submission with the leaflet in a Course Resources Assignment activity.

The majority of students used their mobile phones to create their justification videos and were able to upload them straight into Media Gallery and submit in the assignment.

Maria comments “This is the first time I have used Augmented Reality (AR) videos as a vehicle for an assignment. It seemed very appropriate to use this method as it reflects what the marketing sector is currently using to reach many target audiences.

Student feedback about the module confirmed that they found the use of AR exciting and a welcome alternative to a written paper. Making the videos was straightforward and each student simply used their smartphone. Because the students had to verbalise why they had used certain colour psychology, use of typeface and impactful images it added to their understanding of the design process. Academic integrity was also preserved by the use of a ‘Student Agreement’ that recorded reference material and their agreement that each member of the group had contributed equally to the assignment.

Personally I found this an excellent way of assessing as it demonstrated much more understanding than a traditional written paper. It was also helpful to colleagues who moderated the assignment, easy to use, but above adding an extra dimension to the assignment.”

Recording training videos of equipment usage for forensic chemistry students, and sharing through Course Resources

Samantha-DrakeSamantha Drake. Lecturer in Forensic Science, College of Life and Natural Sciences, University of Derby.

Samantha has flipped! Flipped teaching has entered the educational consciousness over the past few years. Teachers record materials for students to study outside of class so when they meet for lessons or seminars they are already prepped with an idea of what to do, rather than use contact time for demonstrating procedures or explaining material. This leaves more contact time to discuss or practice under the supervision of the expert teacher who can feedback tips or facilitate discussion.

Samantha comments “The practical ran far more smoothly, with fewer initial queries about the lab techniques, than previous years without the videos. It was also great not to have to spend the first half hour or so demonstrating everything in the video – more time efficient and less work for me in the long run as the videos will be used again in future years.”

Samantha used a consumer grade video camera, borrowed from the TEL Media Team, to record for her forensic chemistry students a series of equipment demonstrations and do worked examples of maths question. Titles included “Making a Solution in a Volumetric Flask”, “Amine Calculations”, and “How to do a Titration”.

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Still from How to do a Titration

She then edited and uploaded the videos into Media Gallery, and shared the videos directly into Course Resources for students to watch before coming to lab, and to review afterwards.

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The videos embedded into Course Resources

The cohort comprised 57 students, and as you can see from the statistics of plays the videos were well used.

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Number of plays per video

In conclusion, using some basic commonly available recording equipment, Samantha was able to make her teaching more effective and efficient, and although recording and uploading required some more effort upfront, this will be paid back manifold in future as the resources are reused. Media Gallery is a simple to use video distribution resources which integrates directly into Course Resources and enables staff to create and distribute flipped teaching materials quickly, and directly to students.

 

Sharing audio for peer review and submitting for assessment in Course Resources using Media Gallery

Matt Le Mare. Creative Expressive Therapies, College of Health and Social Care

Matt, who ran the Music and Musicianship module in Spring 2016, wanted a way for students to share their formative music assignment with each other within the Course Resources module so they could do peer feedback. He also wanted the students to submit their final assignment, which comprised a piece of music, through Course Resources.

Matt comments that Media Gallery “…works for me as I wanted to electronically move quickly from assessing audio to text and then back again instead of trolling through usb stick, CDs and DVDs, then reading students’ paper submission, then having to give the feedback on paper. It works for the external examiner because she/he can do the same. For students, they can submit electronically, which is what they wanted to do. They can share it if they wish. It was easily set up, just works, and ‘saves’ time!”.

Sharing media within Course Resources

Media Gallery (Kaltura) was the perfect solution for his requirements. First, using the Media Gallery feature, students were able to upload iterations of their music and publish them within the module.

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A view of the Media Gallery containing students’ formative work

Media Gallery also has a comment feature akin to social media, which allows attributed comments to be posted.

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Submitting media for assignments

Mat also wanted students to submit their final piece of music through Course Resources. Previously dealing with media would have required receiving CDs, DVDs or USB flash memory drives with all of the associated management and potential for damage or loss that entails – especially when required by external examiners.

With Media Gallery, students were able to upload their music and submit it directly through Course Resources “Assignment” where it was safely stored and accessible only to the tutors. External moderators are also able to view the work directly through Course Resources, so there is no more worry about sending off media in the post.

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Summary

Media Gallery provided a simple and robust solution for Mat’s needs. It also enhanced the student experience as they were able to share their music and get feedback from each other which is kept only to the group enrolled within the module. This effectively extended the classroom into an asynchronous space offering more opportunity for students and tutors to interact outside of physical contact time.

The submission of media within Course Resources solved the problem of access and security of assessed work. Pieces were available immediately within Course Resources to tutors and moderators, and management of physical submissions was eliminated.

Using videos in forums for an online course’s student formative assessment

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Yasu Kotera (left), Wendy David. UDOL Online Counselling. University of Derby Online (UDOL).

Students from around the world were studying on the University of Derby Online course in Counselling Skills. Part of the assessment involves students recording their counselling sessions for tutors to view and feedback on. Course Resources is limited in the way it handles large files, especially videos, so Yasu and Wendy were pleased to use Media Gallery (Kaltura) as a way of sharing video. In this case, students recorded a short video, usually on their phone, and shared it by embedding it into a forum. This allowed tutors and peers to comment on the video.

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In this screenshot, the uploaded video is displayed over the forum which contains a dialogue between the student and tutor.

Yasu comments “I manage the counselling programmes at the University of Derby Online Learning. Our programmes include video assessments, where students record their counselling sessions and the tutors and peers make comments on them. We used to mail those DVDs to evaluate their counselling skills, but as the programme expanded, it just became unfeasible. Then we started to use a file transfer system, but it still took a lot of time to up / download the videos. We had been trying to find a scalable and secure way to conduct the video assessments, and heard about Media Gallery. Media Gallery enables students upload their video easily in a secure way, and the tutors and peers can see and make comments to improve their counselling skills. This is really crucial in the counselling studies online. We are planning to use Media Gallery more in our programmes